Creswell Crags…Back To The Ice Age!

Today was a visit to Creswell Crags…

Creswell Crags is an enclosed limestone gorge on the border between Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, England, near the village of Creswell. The cliffs in the ravine contain several caves that were occupied during the last Ice Age, between around 43,000 and 10,000 years ago. Its caves contain the northernmost cave art in Europe. The evidence of occupation found in the rich series of sediments that accumulated over many thousands of years is regarded as internationally unique in demonstrating how prehistoric people managed to live at the extreme northernmost limits of their territory during the Late Pleistocene period.

The caves contain evidence of flint tools from the Mousterian, proto-Solutrean, Creswellian and Maglemosian cultures. They were seasonally occupied by nomadic groups of people during the Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods. Evidence of Neolithic, Bronze Age, Roman and post-medieval activity has also been found there. There is evidence of Neanderthal occupation 50,000–60,000 years ago, a brief Gravettian occupation around 32,000 years ago and use of all the main caves during around 14,000 years ago.

As a result of its unique features, Creswell Crags has been designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

So, as usual here are some photos…enjoy!


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